Flowers Inspired by Rebecca Crompton

One of our assignments for Level 3 Stitch was to create a piece inspired by Rebecca Crompton. She was an embroidery teacher in Great Britain in the early 20th century. You can read more about her on the V&A site and see some of her work.

Nuno Felted sample with grey wool and red/green silk in woven pattern

As I was thinking about what to create, I came across this old sample of nuno felting in my stash. I was thinking of gardens and flowers (Rebecca Crompton has several garden themed pieces.) I thought this would work for a background piece.

Nuno Felt stitched with Kantha stitch in hand dyed wool lace weight threads.

I decided to add some base stitching. I used hand dyed lace weight wool thread with running stitch.

Applique fabric pieces applied to stitched surface of nuno felt.

The next step was finding different fabric for the flower elements. I cut out various flower shapes and tried them out in a variety of places on the background. I wanted the colors to move throughout the piece but for it to all feel cohesive. Now to stitch them in place. I could have fused them down but I don’t like the way fusing flattens everything. I prefer raw edges, a bit of fraying and texture.

Completed piece of nuno felt, stitching and hand stitched applique

Here is the final result. I added a few French knots and couched down a bit of yarn for the branch at the top left. This isn’t my usual style but I enjoy the movement and liveliness of the piece.

Ponderosa Pine Applique

I have always loved the bark on the Ponderosa pines. It has great texture and the pieces that slough off look like puzzle pieces. Needless to say, I have a collection of those.

Here’s a photo of the Ponderosa pine bark. Not only great texture, but interesting colors and shapes.

Here’s a photo of the resulting applique I created based on bark. I used a felt background with inclusions to give more volume to the raised areas. I then added a variety of silk applique and stitched down with hand dyed wool thread in a variety of colors. I then machine stitched the background to flatten those areas and give the piece more depth.

Shades of Green Applique

For one of my applique projects in Level 3 Stitch, I decided to use a nuno felted background and create a piece similar to the ones that I make to sell in a gallery. Here’s the beginning of Shades of Green. Guess what? It reminded me of a forest, so on to the applique.

I added silk organza for the tree trunks, a mix of chopped up fabric for the leaves and stitching for the highlights. The finished piece was framed and is now hanging in my hallway.

Thanks for stopping by!

Marsh Applique

Here is another piece that I completed in Level 3 Advanced Studies in Experimental Stitch class.

This is what the piece started with. Mainly deconstructed screen printed fabric and a few pieces of shibori dyed fabric. It needed more so on to layering and stitching.

Here’s the finished piece and I have called this one, Marsh. It’s kind of amazing what layers of fabric can do to change the look of a piece.

Simplicity

I love simplicity in design. It’s not easy to achieve but I always admire when a piece is taken back to the bare essence of an idea. So when Textileartist.org announced a challenge by Emily Jo Gibbs, I was intrigued with her style. The instructions were to find a stick or an object such as a paintbrush to be your inspiration. Then, sketch the item and use that sketch to create an applique. Ha! Applique is perfect for another homework assignment. Plus, the simplicity of using a sketch as the design. I have hundreds of sketches that I could use. But I found a stick, and did a sketch of it, including the shadow.

Then I created a pattern for the applique pieces out of tracing paper, chose some hand dyed organza and a linen background.

Here’s the documentation in my sketchbook for Level 3 Stitch class.

Then on to hand stitching while listening to a portion of an online class given by MOMA. I love the simplicity of the piece. A bare bones sketch in applique. As I said, I have loads of sketches that I could recreate this way.

For the MOMA class, the artist featured this week was Barnett Newman. I had never heard of him before and it was interesting to learn about his style. Again, simplicity is evident. His work that he is best known for are his “zips”, the line of yellow oxide down the middle of the painting in a solid colored background. But the “zips” weren’t usually exact and had more complexity to them as you get closer and view the painting at more length. Many of his paintings are really large so that as you get closer, you are engulfed by color. The painting above is done in his style. Acrylic paint on sketchbook paper. I don’t think it quite gives the same impact as it might have on canvas or board. But it was an interesting experiment.

It’s a fun course and now we are studying Willem de Kooning.

Thanks for stopping by and stay safe!